unix

How to install the open source application Darktable on OS X

How to install the open source application Darktable on OS X

Paul Bissex
A step-by-step guide from real life Go to darktable.org/install. Skim page. Download some tarball. Scratch head over .tar.xz format. brew install xz xz --decompress darktable-1.4.2.tar.xz cd darktable-1.4.2 ./build.sh --prefix /opt/darktable --buildtype Release Fail. brew install cmake brew install glib brew install gtk Fix weird permissions error inside existing libpng install. brew install gtk again brew install webp brew install lensfun build.sh again… fail, needs rsvg2 No available formula for rsvg2 No available formula for rsvg Give up on build.

The standard unix password manager you never heard of

Paul Bissex
Recently I switched my work environment from OS X to Ubuntu (a post on that project is in the works). For years I’ve been using the standard Apple Keychain app, which has several points in its favor: it’s included with the OS, it integrates well with a lot of applications, and is not trying to “freemium” me into a paid tier. However, it’s OS X only, which meant I had to find something new.

Keeping emacs backup files tidy

Paul Bissex
In the shell, emacs is my editor of choice. However, it has one default behavior that has gotten in the way more often than it has helped – automatic generation of backup files in the same directory as the original. Emacs is great for making quick edits to files on the web server. But I don’t want or need all those *~ files sitting around. The material is all in version control, so I can already revert to any point in history.

A tiny little dpaste.com API

Paul Bissex
When I created dpaste, I tried to make it both a simple browser-based tool and a simple RESTful API. With very little work you could write a script that created a new paste item with a single POST. Over the life of the site a few people have discovered and played with that “secret” API. I’ve now made it a bit more official. The new API has its own URL (versioned, even!

History lesson

Paul Bissex
This has been going around – give people a peek at what commands you run most often. I ran this on my server, where I spend most of my shell time: > history|awk '{a[$2]++} END{for(i in a){printf "%5d\t%s\n",a[i],i}}'|sort -rn|head 103 hg 81 cd 67 ll 29 ./manage.py 23 ab 21 re-ap 17 hgup 14 svn 13 cat 12 ls Notes: Mercurial has pushed my use of Subversion way down.