spam

Summer Spam

Paul Bissex
Spam is occupying more than its customary share of my attention in recent weeks. I’ve long had a morbid fascination with sleazy human communication (hence Purportal.com). That makes the always-relentless stream of spam, though not exactly welcome, at least interesting. Spam volume also seems to have increased during this period. The number of spam attempts my mail server rejects per day had been steady at around 3,000 for months. Now it’s back up around 5,000 or 6,000.

SPF-enabled spam domains

Paul Bissex
Among the many anti-spam measures on my mail server – which help me reject 5000 spam attempts per day – is SPF. SPF allows domain name owners to specify which mail servers are allowed to send its mail. That makes it an excellent way to detect address forgeries, a favorite spammer tool. One of the early questions raised about SPF was: won’t spammers just buy their own domains and set up their own SPF records that say it’s all OK?

Email servers: how not to do it

Paul Bissex
I run my own mail server. I don’t consider myself an especially skilled administrator, so I shouldn’t point fingers. However, in recent weeks I’ve had the following experience more than once. A delivery-failure message arrives from an unfamiliar host. The (quoted) orginal message is nothing I ever sent. The recipient is unfamiliar to me. The “sender” of the original message is an email address I control, but not one I ever send mail with.

Comment Spam Stats

Paul Bissex
Since January 12th: Valid comments accepted by Akismet: 36 Spam comments accepted by Akismet: 17 Spam comments rejected by Akismet: 814 I don’t have a number for false positives, but given that I’ve received zero email complaints I’ll assume the number is low if not zero. This gives Akismet about a 98% success rate on catching spam, which is pretty good. It makes my life better. Having more spam comments than real comments get through the gates can be really depressing for a blog owner.

I'm not spamming you

Paul Bissex
Damned spammers. Looks like a big batch of drug-spam just went out with my personal email forged as the sender. The number of backscatter messages I’ve gotten today exceeds the number of spams that usually make it through to me in a week. Why? Because my anti-spam measures are mostly about blocking messages from “bad” mail servers, and backscatter comes from “good” mail servers. I’m laying a lot of ironic emphasis on those quotes around “good” because I shouldn’t be getting those backscatter messages at all.